Angels
The Number 12
Angelprince
Gouvernor
Angel of the month
Guardian Angel
Color Correspondences
Angels from A - Z
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
Metatron  englisch
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
Web Design
L

Angel of The Last Judgment - Michael, Gabriel (also Abel, as in The Testament of Abraham).

Angel of the Law - Where "Law" has the meaning of Torah (i.e., the Pentrateuch), the angel is Dina, also known as Yefefiah, Iofiel, Zgzagael.

Angel of Lawlessness - Beliar (Beliel, Mastanbuchus).

Angel of (the sign of) Leo - In ceremonial magic, the angel is Ol. There are also governing spitits of the sign and these are Sagham and Sreatiel, according to Rabbi Chromer, the Hebrew cabalist quoted in Levi, Transcendental Magic.

Angel of Liberty - Unidentified by name. In Victor Hugo's La Fin de Satan, it is through the angel of liberty that Satan is to be finally redeemed.

Angel of Libra (the Balances) - Jael, in ceremonial magic. In The Magus, the angel is Zuriel. According to Rabbi Chromer the 2 governing apirits of Libra are Grasgarben and Hadakiel (Chadakiel). It was from the writings of Rabbi Chomer that Gaffarel (17th-century man of learning and librarian to Cardinal Richelieu) drew many of his predictions.

Angel of Life - In his poem "The Two Angels," Longfellow speaks of the angel of life and the angel of death (both unnamed). They are dressed in robes of white, one "crowned with amaranth as with flame," The other "with asphodels like flakes of light.: Both angels, says Longfellow, are from God "on celestial embassy."

Angel of Light - Isaac, Gabriel, Jesus, and satan have been called angels of light, Satan only in his disguise as such. In Jewish tradition, Isaac was looked upon as an angel of light because of the supernatural brightness of his countenance at birth (a birth announced by Michael). In Christian lore of the Middle Ages, Gabriel was the angel of light. In Parsi religion, it was Mihr (Meher, Mithra); also Parvagigar (who, in Arabic, was Rab-un-naw, "lord of the species"). According to Midrash Konen, 300 angels of light dwell in the 3rd Heaven where they "unceasingly sing God's praises and watch over the Garden of Eden and the Tree of Life." It should be explained that there are two paradises: the terrestrial one and the heavenly one. In the cabala, the sun, included among the planets, is regarded as an angel of light.

Angel of the Light of day - Shamshiel, who is also the prince of Paradise.

Angel of Lightning - Barkiel (Barakiel) or Uriel, according to the Book of Jubilees; Ginzberg, The Legends of the Jews; 3 Enoch, Barkiel is also the angel of February and is customarily citedas one of the 7 archangels. In Conybeare, The Testament of Solomon, as in Shah. The Secret Lore of Magic, the angel of lightning is claimed to be the only power able to overcome the demon Envy.

Angel of Lights - In the Zadokite Fragments the following appears: "Moses and Aaron continued in their charge through Beliel in his comming has set up Jannes and his brother in opposition of them." Raphael, as aregent of the sun; Uriel, also called regent of the sun; and Shamshiel, "light of day," may similarly be designated angels of light.

Angel of Longevity - the angels most commonly cited in occult writings as controllers or dispensers of longevity are Seheiah, Mumaih, Rehael. The last-named is of the order of powers.

Angel of the Lord - A Biblical theophorism, usually identified or persinified as Michael, Metatron, Malachi, Gabriel, Akatriel, Yehadriel, Homadiel, Phinehas, etc. Where the expression occurs in the Old Testament, particularly in the earlier books, it may be taken to mean, though not always, God Himself. In Numbers , the Angel of the Lord is the adversary (i.e., ha-satan) acting for the Lord. The apparent contradiction between similar accounts in II Samuel (where it is the Lord who provoked David to number Israel) and I Chronicles (where it is Satan who does the provoking) may be resolved if (1) Satan were spelled lowercase to denote not the name of an angel (as it was, in fact, not meant to denote) but the designation of an office, the office of adversary; and if (2) this adversary were understood to be acting for God--that is, acting as the angel of the Lord. In Judges II, the angel of the Lord comes up from Gilgal to Bochim to remind the Israelites of the Lord's promise "which I sware unto your fathers" to lead them to the Promised land. In the New Testament, (where Peter is released from prison), the angel of the Lord is not the Lord, nut a heavenly messenger sent by the Lord and acting for the Lord. In Acts, where Herod is struck down by the "angel of the lord," the term may be equated with , or stand for, the angel of death. Justin held that one of the 3 angels that visited Abraham was the Word (i.e., the Logos or Holy Ghost). Philo thought that the other 2 were Christ and God Himself, or (again) the angel of the Lord, the 3 constituting a prefiguring of the Trinity. The subject of Abraham "entertaining angels unawares" was popular with painters of the early Italian school. The scene is depicted in a woodcut in the Colgne Bible (1478-1480); it also figures in one of Hans Holbein's wood engravings (wher by the way, the 3 angels are represented without wings). It was an angel of the Lord, say the rabbis, who taught Abraham Hebrew, "the language of Revelation." The term angel of the Lord, or angel of Godm or angel of Yahweh appears in connection with the story of Hagar; the sacrifice of Isaac; the burning bush; Gidean; parents of Samson; David at the threshing floor of Araunah; Elijah; the smitting of the Assyrian host; etc.

Angel of the Lord of Hosts - On high, the angel is Michael' on earth it is the High-priest, so designated "by reason that he belongs to the side of Grace."

Angel of the Love - Theliel, Rahamiel, Raphael, Donquel, etc. In the cabala the Roman goddess Venus also figure as an angel of love. In rabbinic lore the angel of love (not named) approved the creation of man when God first proposed the idea to an assembly of the top hierachs (some of those who disapproved were punished--Rf. Ginzberg, The Legends of the Jews). In Talmudic,Zoharistic, and Mandaen sources we find Liwet and Anael (the latter angel of the star of love) serving as additional angels of love. In ancient Persian writings, Mihr was the angel who watched over love and friendship.

Angel of Lust - In Talmud Bereshith Raba 85, and according to Rabbi Jochanan commenting on Genisis, when "Judah was about to pass by, without noticing, tamar (Judah's daughter-in-law, squatting like a harlot at the crossroads), God caused the angel of lust to present itself to him." The angel is not named--but compare with Phaarzuph )or Priapus), whom Arnobius in Adversus Nationes III, called "the hellespontian god of lust."

Angel of Luxury - In his commentary on Matthew, Origen says that anyone who "falls away from Michael is put into subjection to the angel of luxury, then to the angel of punishment."

marion burke symbole00014 2004 - 2017

abramelin
angels
elfen
engel
garten
gesundheit
goetter
goetterbilder
guten appetit
handarbeiten
haende
henoch
karten
kaschewskiahnen
kerstinkaschewski
kreise
lebensbaum
meditation
meister
mensch
morgellons
mystik
pendeltafeln
pflanzenweg
pflanzen
planeten
rituale
schöpfungsgeschichte
schriften
seelenwolken
stammbaum
sternensee-tarot
steine
sonstiges
symbolon

Impressum
Gästebuch


Besucherzaehler  

casinovergleich24's Website